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Bikes and breakfast at Hassop Station

Bikes And Coffee At Hassop Station

Bikes and breakfast at Hassop Station

Bikes and breakfast at Hassop Station. A total winning combination for the Roche family – well one half anyway. If you’re looking for delicious food plus an amazing family-friendly day out, Hassop Station near Bakewell is just 20 minutes from Wheeldon Trees Cottages.

Close to Bakewell

We visited on a very sunny bank holiday Sunday. It’s very close to Bakewell and the beautiful village of Ashford in the Water. So even if you spend a few hours at Hassop, there’s plenty to do locally. The pub in Ashford is called The Bulls Head and it serves really good food at reasonable prices.

We arrived at Hassop early but it was already getting busy. The large cafe opens at 9 am and serves into the evening until 9 pm on Fridays and Saturdays. We clocked delicious sourdough pizzas on the menu so this could be a good one for the journey home after visiting Chatsworth on a weekend.

On the menu

On the menu for breakfast was the traditional English and vegan English breakfast but also new classics including overnight soaked oats, smashed avocado on bagel and buns of every description. The accompanying coffee was delicious and strong enough for even Mr Roche’s tastes! Service was swift and there was an abundance of tables both inside and out to choose from.

Next to the cafe is a beautiful high-end gift shop with greetings cards, trendy bobble hats and leather goods. However, such was Mr Roche’s hunger, I, unfortunately, didn’t get to spend long in here.

Bike hire

Of course, what most people come to Hassop for is the bike hire. It sits on the Monsal Trail and has a thriving bike hire business. The team hires out both traditional and electric bikes and on the day we visited they were doing swift business. The trail runs along the former Midland line for 8.5 miles between Blackwell Mill in Chee Dale and Coombs Road at Bakewell.

The majority of the route was made public in 1981, but four disused railway tunnels had to stay closed for safety concerns. Public walkways were constructed so that people could still pass through them.

The four railway tunnels, Headstone Tunnel, Cressbrook Tunnel, Litton Tunnel, and Chee Tor Tunnel, were made accessible to trail users starting on May 25, 2011. Each tunnel is illuminated during the course of a typical day and is around 400 metres long.

To find out more visit the Hassop Station website.

To view our cottage availability click here.